2015 Election Guide - Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty

NPT-image.pngCJPME is pleased to publish the next of a 15 part election series analyzing the positions of Canada’s political parties. CJPME hopes that, by revealing what parties have said and done on key Middle East issues, Canadians will be better informed voters in the upcoming elections. The current analysis studies each party’s position on Canada's vetoing of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty at the UN in May, 2015, out of deference to Israel's opposition. 

 View analysis in PDF format

upper.png 

lower.png

Grades-big.png

La version française suit...

Executive Summary

In May of 2015, the Harper government helped block an important UN plan to rid the world of nuclear weapons, entirely out of deference to Israel’s concerns about the plan.  While many Canadians may not have noticed this story, it had important and direct implications for the future stability of the Middle East regarding nuclear weapons.  Kowtowing to the interests of the Israeli government, the Harper government reneged on a years-long commitment to address the question of nuclear arms in the Middle East.  While the NDP was critical of this move by the Harper government, the NDP made no attempt to address the Israel-oriented motivation of the government.  As such, the NDP seemed to want to score points on the government’s shortcomings without demonstrating any moral or political leadership itself.  Despite its importance, the Liberals, Bloc and Greens did not weigh in on this issue.

Background

In 2015, Canada helped block a UN plan to rid the Middle East of nuclear weapons while citing Israel’s security concerns, a move that was met with widespread international disappointment. Both Canada and Britain supported the United States in opposing a document at the United Nations calling on the UN to hold a disarmament conference on the Middle East by 2016. Such a conference could have obliged Israel to publicly acknowledge that it is a nuclear power – something it has never done.[i]

The 2015 decision added a new chapter to a long dysfunctional history relating to the NPT, described as follows: [ii]

  • The NPT is an imbalanced treaty, as it allows nuclear powers to keep nuclear weapons, and prevents non-nuclear powers from getting them.  Under the treaty, the nuclear powers were supposed to have liquidated their nuclear arsenals long ago, but never did so.
  • The NPT would have fallen apart in 1995, had the nuclear powers not agreed to have a conference by 2010 to ensure a weapons of mass destruction free (WMD-free) Middle East.
  • The NPT 2010 final document promised a conference on the issue before the end of 2012 – a promise which remained unfulfilled.
  • Discussions in 2015 centered again on this promise from 1995, to impose a March 2016 deadline for WMD-free Middle East conference.
  • However, in 2015, the U.S. objected to the “arbitrary deadline,” while Canada insisted that negotiations on the issue include Israel, a non-NPT party. Internationally, the US, UK, and Canada were blamed for preventing the promised conference.

On Canada’s refusal, Minister of Foreign Affairs Rob Nicholson issued a statement on 23 May 2015 declaring, “Canada can support only a legitimate Middle East WMD conference process that addresses the concerns of all states in the region, including Israel’s, and ensures their participation based on consent… It was with deep regret that Canada, alongside its close allies the United States and the United Kingdom, was unable to support consensus on today’s 2015 NPT Review Conference outcome document”[iii]

The question that first comes to mind is why would three NPT member states (Canada, the UK and the US) prioritize the interests of a non-member state (Israel) over those of all the other member states combined. More specifically, it is incredibly ironic that Canada would insist on trying to block a motion because a non-treaty member had not been consulted. As an analogy, imagine an international sporting association holding a conference to discuss rule changes to an international sport, and being told it can’t finalize a decision because a country which had chosen not to be a member had not been consulted.

Beatrice Fihn, spokeswoman for the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, a coalition of 400 non-governmental organizations in 95 countries, questioned the logic behind this move by asserting, “Three countries take their cue from a non-state party — Israel isn’t even part of the treaty — and thereby have this final say.”[iv] Canada’s move to block the UN plan and reach the required consensus, after four weeks of negotiations, means nuclear disarmament efforts in the Middle East have been blocked until at least 2020.[v]

Conservative Position

Aside from comments and statements by Foreign Affairs Minister Rob Nicholson, Canada’s role in breaking consensus at the 2015 NPT Review Conference was welcomed by Conservatives. Speaking to the House of Commons on 3 June 2015, Conservative MP John Carmichael stated:

“Mr. Speaker […] We remain committed to upholding and strengthening the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty. However, like the U.S. and the U.K., we could not support consensus at the conference. We will never support any policy whose sole purpose is the isolation or the embarrassment of our greatest ally in the region […] Unlike the NDP, this Conservative government not only recognizes Israel’s right to exist but its inherent right to defend itself by itself.”[vi]

Also addressing the House of Commons on 3 June 2015, Chris Alexander, Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, concluded:

“Mr. Speaker […] Canada remains fully committed to upholding and strengthening the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. Under this Conservative government, Canada will only support a legitimate Middle East weapons of mass destruction conference process that addresses the concerns of all countries in the region, including Israel.”[vii]

The Harper government’s approach to the NPT continues its policy of “Israeli exceptionalism,” where the rules that are applied to everyone else are not applied to Israel.  By blocking the 2015 conference, Canada works to ensure that Israel remains the sole nuclear power in the Middle East for another five years.  Of course, such exceptionalism goes over badly with other countries in the region, which therefore have no incentive to respect the treaty themselves.

The Harper government would only recognize an NPT framework that 1) addresses the concerns of all states in the region, 2) recognizes Israel’s unique security concerns vis-à-vis other states in the region, and 3) accommodates Israel’s nuclear arsenal. Ironically, allowing Israel to keep a nuclear arsenal fails to address “the concerns of all states in the region,” the very first of the above-mentioned points. Another problem is that such a framework delegitimizes the security concerns of non-nuclear states within Israel’s reach.

NDP Position

As the Official Opposition, the NDP was outspoken against the Canadian government’s role in breaking consensus at the 2015 NPT Review Conference. In fact, the only statements CJPME could find against this move by the Harper government came from the NDP.

In May 2015, NDP Foreign Affairs critic Paul Dewar stressed the importance of the NPT Review Conference for stability in the Middle East:

“When it comes to the Middle East, many have said this is the most dangerous place in the world to have nuclear weapons,” said Dewar. “If we can get other countries to abide by nuclear non-proliferation in the Middle East, then that can advance the cause globally.”[viii]

Speaking to the House of Commons on June 2nd, 2015, Dewar accused “Conservatives [of playing] the spoiler role by blocking consensus at the nuclear non-proliferation.”[ix] Dewar also questioned Canada’s resolve to rid the world of nuclear weapons:

“Mr. Speaker, while the international community is taking meaningful steps toward a world free from the threat of nuclear weapons, Canada is sitting on the sidelines [...] Why is the government not working with our allies constructively to free the world from nuclear weapons?”[x]

While all of the points made by Dewar are on-mark, it is important to notice how he does not make an issue of the Conservatives’ Israeli exceptionalism.  That is, Dewar decries the outcome of the conference, but fails to address the core issue with the Harper government’s approach: that it was based on a strategy to favour Israeli interests over all others in the region.

Liberal Position

CJPME could find no statement issued by the Liberal Party regarding Canada’s role in breaking consensus at the 2015 NPT Review Conference.

Bloc Quebecois Position

CJPME could find no statement issued by the Bloc Quebecois regarding Canada’s role in breaking consensus at the 2015 NPT Review Conference.

Green Position

CJPME could find no statement issued by the Green Party regarding Canada’s role in breaking consensus at the 2015 NPT Review Conference. 


Sommaire

En mai 2015, le gouvernement Harper a contribué à bloquer un important plan de l'ONU visant à débarrasser le monde des armes nucléaires et ce, entièrement par déférence pour les préoccupations d'Israël à ce chapitre. De nombreux Canadiens peuvent ne pas avoir noté cette histoire, bien qu’elle ait eu des répercussions importantes et directes sur la stabilité future du Moyen-Orient en matière d'armes nucléaires. Se pliant aux intérêts du gouvernement israélien, le gouvernement Harper est revenu sur un engagement de longue date de s’occuper de la question des armes nucléaires au Moyen-Orient. Alors que le NPD a critiqué cette décision du gouvernement Harper, il n'a pas tenté d’aborder la motivation pro-Israël du gouvernement. Ce faisant, le NPD semble vouloir marquer des points sur les lacunes du gouvernement sans lui-même faire preuve de leadership moral ou politique. Malgré l’importance de cet enjeu, les libéraux, le Bloc et les Verts ne se sont pas prononcés.

Contexte

En 2015, le Canada, prétextant la sécurité israélienne, a contribué à bloquer un projet de l’ONU visant l’élimination des armes nucléaires au Moyen-Orient. Ce geste a soulevé l’indignation sur la scène internationale. Le Canada et la Grande-Bretagne ont tous deux appuyé les États-Unis en s’opposant à un projet de conférence des Nations-Unies sur le désarmement du Moyen-Orient d’ici 2016. La tenue d’une telle conférence aurait pu contraindre Israël à confirmer publiquement son statut de puissance nucléaire, chose qu’il n’a jamais faite1.

La décision de 2015 n’est que le nouveau chapitre d’une longue et malheureuse saga concernant le Traité de non-prolifération des armes nucléaires (TNP), dont voici quelques extraits2 :

  • Le TNP est un traité inéquitable. Il permet aux puissances nucléaires de conserver leurs armes et empêche les autres pays de s’en procurer. Selon le traité, les puissances nucléaires devraient depuis longtemps s’être débarrassées de leur arsenal nucléaire : il n’en est toutefois rien.
  • Le TNP serait mort en 1995 si les puissances nucléaires ne s’étaient pas entendues pour tenir une conférence avant 2010 pour créer un Moyen-Orient exempt d’armes nucléaires (WMD-free).
  • Le rapport final du TNP de 2010 faisait la promesse de tenir une conférence sur le sujet avant la fin 2012 – une promesse non tenue.
  • En 2015, une nouvelle date limite (mars 2016) a été fixée pour respecter la promesse de 1995 de tenir une conférence sur un Moyen-Orient exempt d’armes nucléaires.
  • Toutefois, en 2015, les États-Unis se sont opposés à la « date limite arbitraire », tandis que le Canada a exigé qu’Israël prenne part aux négociations. Ce pays n’est pas signataire du TNP. À l’international, les États-Unis, la Grande-Bretagne et le Canada furent blâmés d’avoir compromis la tenue de la conférence.

Après le refus canadien, le ministre aux Affaires étrangères Rob Nicholson a publié cette déclaration, le 23 mai 2015 : « Le Canada ne peut appuyer qu’un processus de Conférence sur les armes de destruction massive au Moyen-Orient qui soit légitime, qui réponde aux préoccupations de tous les États de la région, y compris Israël, et qui garantisse leur participation fondée sur le consentement […] Il est profondément regrettable que le Canada, comme ses proches alliés, les États-Unis et le Royaume-Uni, n’ait pu s’associer au consensus sur ce document final de la Conférence d’examen du TNP de 2015.3 »

La première question qui vient à l’esprit est pourquoi trois États signataires du TNP (le Canada, le R.-U. et les É.-U.) protègent les intérêts d’un État non-signataire (Israël) avant ceux de tous les États signataires. Plus spécifiquement, il semble très contradictoire que le Canada tente de bloquer une requête parce qu’un pays non-signataire n’a pas été consulté. Ainsi, à titre comparatif, imaginez qu’une fédération internationale de sport tienne une conférence pour discuter d’un changement aux règlements. Serait-il vraisemblable que cette même fédération ne puisse procéder à aucun changement parce qu’un pays qui a choisi de ne pas participer n’a pas été consulté?

Beatrice Fihn, porte-parole de la Campagne internationale pour l’abolition des armes nucléaires, une coalition de 400 ONG de 95 pays, s’interroge sur la logique de la démarche : « Trois pays se rangent du côté d’un pays non-signataire, en l’occurrence Israël, et ils ont le dernier mot.4 »  L’effort canadien pour bloquer le projet de l’ONU et éviter un consensus, après quatre semaines de négociations, fait en sorte que les tentatives de désarmement du Moyen-Orient sont reportées à 2020, au plus tôt5.

Position des conservateurs

En plus des commentaires du ministre aux Affaires étrangères Rob Nicholson, le refus du Canada d’appuyer le consensus à la Conférence d'examen du TNP de 2015 a reçu l’approbation des conservateurs. À la Chambre des communes, le 3 juin 2015, le député conservateur John Carmichael a déclaré :

« M. le Président […] Nous sommes toujours résolus à respecter et à renforcer le Traité sur la non-prolifération des armes nucléaires. Comme les États-Unis et le Royaume-Uni, il nous a été impossible d'appuyer la position adoptée par les autres pays lors de la conférence. Nous n'appuierons jamais une politique qui a pour seul but d'isoler ou d'embarrasser notre principal allié dans cette région du monde. […] Contrairement au NPD, le gouvernement conservateur reconnaît à Israël le droit non seulement d'exister, mais aussi de se défendre.6 »

Toujours à la Chambre des communes, le 3 juin 2015, Chris Alexander, ministre de l’Immigration et de la Citoyenneté, a rajouté :

« M. le Président […] Le Canada demeure fermement résolu à respecter et à renforcer le Traité de non-prolifération des armes nucléaires. Sous le gouvernement conservateur, le Canada appuiera la tenue d'une conférence légitime sur les armes de destruction massive au Moyen-Orient seulement si elle tient compte des préoccupations de tous les pays de la région, y compris Israël.7 »

L’approche du gouvernement Harper concernant le TNP perpétue l’« exception israélienne » : les règles valent pour tous, sauf Israël. En bloquant la conférence de 2015, le Canada s’assure qu’Israël demeure la seule puissance nucléaire au Moyen-Orient pendant encore cinq ans. Bien entendu, cet « exceptionnalisme » n’est pas sans offusquer les autres pays du Moyen-Orient qui n’ont, par conséquent, aucune motivation à respecter le traité.

Le gouvernement Harper ne reconnaîtrait l’encadrement du TNP que s’il : 1) tenait compte des préoccupations de tous les pays de la région, 2) tenait compte des préoccupations de sécurité particulières à Israël en rapport avec d’autres États de la région et, 3) permettait le maintien de l’arsenal nucléaire d’Israël. Or, il serait contradictoire de laisser Israël maintenir son arsenal nucléaire tout en « [tenant] compte des préoccupations de tous les pays de la région », premier point mentionné précédemment. L’encadrement ainsi proposé pose aussi problème parce qu’il fait abstraction des préoccupations de sécurité des pays ne possédant aucune arme nucléaire mais situés à la portée des armes israéliennes.

Position des néo-démocrates

En tant qu’opposition officielle, le NPD s’est indigné quand le gouvernement canadien a rompu le consensus à la Conférence des Parties chargée d’examiner le Traité sur la non-prolifération des armes nucléaires (TNP) de 2015. En fait, d’après les recherches de CJPMO, le NPD est le seul parti à s’être déclaré contre cette initiative du gouvernement Harper.

En mai 2015, le porte-parole aux Affaires étrangères du NPD, Paul Dewar, a rappelé l’importance de la Conférence d’examen du TNP pour la stabilité au Moyen-Orient :

« Nombreux sont ceux qui croient que le Moyen-Orient est le pire endroit du monde pour des armes nucléaires », a déclaré Dewar. « Si nous pouvons convaincre d’autres pays de se conformer à la non-prolifération nucléaire au Moyen-Orient, alors la cause pourra progresser mondialement.8 »

Alors qu’il s’adressait à la Chambre des communes le 2 juin 2015, Dewar a accusé les conservateurs d’avoir « joué les trouble-fêtes en bloquant le consensus […] concernant le Traité sur la non-prolifération des armes nucléaires »9. Il s’est aussi interrogé sur la volonté du Canada d’éliminer les armes nucléaires à l’échelle planétaire :

« Monsieur le Président, alors que la communauté internationale prend des mesures concrètes afin de mettre le monde à l'abri d'une menace nucléaire, le Canada reste à l'écart. [...]Pourquoi le gouvernement ne collabore-t-il pas avec nos alliés afin de libérer le monde des armes nucléaires?10 »

Même si tous les arguments de Dewar sont justes, il est important de noter qu’il ne soulève pas le problème de l’exceptionnalisme israélien prôné par les conservateurs. Ainsi, Dewar dénonce l’issue malheureuse de la conférence, mais il ne s’attaque pas au nœud du problème, à savoir que l’approche du gouvernement Harper cherche à favoriser les intérêts israéliens au détriment de tous les autres pays de la région.

Position des libéraux

CJPMO n’a pas trouvé de déclaration du Parti libéral concernant le rôle du Canada dans le bris du consensus à la Conférence des Parties chargée d’examiner le TNP de 2015.

Position du Bloc Québécois

CJPMO n’a pas trouvé de déclaration du Bloc Québécois concernant le rôle du Canada dans le bris du consensus à la Conférence des Parties chargée d’examiner le TNP de 2015. 

Position du Parti Vert

CJPMO n’a pas trouvé de déclaration du Parti vert concernant le rôle du Canada dans le bris du consensus à la Conférence des Parties chargée d’examiner le TNP de 2015. 


[i] Blanchfield, Mike, “Canada Helps Block UN Plan To Rid World Of Nukes, Citing Israel Defence,” Huffington Post, April 25, 2015, last updated April 26, 2015, http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/05/25/canada-helps-block-un-pla_n_7437480.html

[ii] Wan, Wilfred, “Why the 2015 NPT Review Conference Fell Apart,” United Nations University Centre for Policy Research, May 28, 2015, accessed August 9, 2015, http://cpr.unu.edu/why-the-2015-npt-review-conference-fell-apart.html  

[iii] “Canada Joins U.S. and U.K. in Breaking Consensus at 2015 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference,” Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada, May 23, 2015, http://www.international.gc.ca/media/aff/news-communiques/2015/05/23b.aspx?lang=eng

[iv] Blanchfield, Mike, “Canada Helps Block UN Plan To Rid World Of Nukes, Citing Israel Defence,” Huffington Post, April 25, 2015, last updated April 26, 2015, http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/05/25/canada-helps-block-un-pla_n_7437480.html

[v] Blanchfield, Mike, “Canada helps block UN plan to rid world of nukes, citing defence of Israel,” The Globe and Mail, April 25, 2015, http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/canada-helps-block-un-plan-to-rid-world-of-nukes-citing-defence-of-israel/article24602968/

[vi] Carmichael, John, “Foreign Affairs – Statements By Members,” Open Parliament, June 3, 2015, https://openparliament.ca/debates/2015/6/3/john-carmichael-1/

[vii] Alexander, Chris, “Foreign Affairs – Oral Questions,” Open Parliament, June 3, 2015, https://openparliament.ca/debates/2015/6/3/chris-alexander-1/

[viii] Blanchfield, Mike, “Canada cites defence for Israel in blocking UN plan to curb nuclear weapons,” CBC News, April 25, 2015, http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-cites-defence-for-israel-in-blocking-un-plan-to-curb-nuclear-weapons-1.3087073

[ix] Dewar, Paul, “Foreign Affairs – Oral Questions,” Open Parliament, June 2, 2015, https://openparliament.ca/debates/2015/6/2/paul-dewar-1/

[x] Ibid.

 

Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.